Moving on from Red Hat.

After eleven and a half years, today is my final day at Red Hat.
I’ll write more about what comes next in the new year.

In the meantime, here’s a slightly edited version of a mail I sent internally yesterday.


In 2003, I got an email from Michael Johnson, about a secretive new thing Red Hat was working on called "Fedora". No-one was quite sure what it was going to be (some may argue we're still figuring it out), but he was pretty sure I'd want to be a part of it. "How'd you feel about taking care of _any_ kernel problems that come in for this thing?" he asked. I was terrified, but excited at the opportunities to learn a lot of stuff outside my usual areas of expertise.

With barely any real detail as to what I was signing up for, I jumped at the opportunity. Within my first few months, I had some concerns over whether or not I had made a good decision. Then Michael left for rPath, and I seriously started to have my doubts.

While everyone was figuring out what Fedora was going to be, I was thrown in at the deep end. "Here's Red Hat Linux 7, 8 and 9, you maintain the kernel for those now. Go". I remember looking at bugzilla scrolling through page after page of bugs thinking "This is going to be a nightmare" At the same time, RHEL 3 was really starting to take shape. I looked at what the guys working on RHEL were doing and thought "Well, this sucks, but those guys.. they _really_ have work to do". As much as I was buried alive in work, I relished every moment of it, learning as much as I could in what little spare time I had.

Then Fedora finally happened. For those not around back then, Fedora Core 1 was pretty much what Red Hat Linux 10 would have been from a kernel pov. A nasty hairball of patches that weren't going upstream (execshield! 4g4g! Tux! CIPE!) that even their authors had stopped maintaining, and a bunch of features backported from 2.5 to 2.4. I get the shakes when I think back to the horrors of maintaining that mess, but like the horrors of RHL before it, it was an amazing learning experience (mostly "what not to do").

But for all its warts, Fedora gained traction, and after Fedora 2 moved to a 2.6 kernel, things really started to take shape. As Fedora's community started to grow, things got even busier in bugzilla than RHL had ever been.

Then somehow I got talked into also being RHEL4 kernel maintainer for a while.
It turned out that juggling Fedora 3, Fedora 4, Rawhide, RHEL4 GA, and RHEL4 U1 means you don't get a lot of time to sleep. So after finding another sucker to deal with the RHEL work, I moved back to just doing Fedora work, and in another big turning point, we started to slowly grow out the Fedora kernel team.

Over the years that followed, the only thing that remained constant was the inflow of bugs. At any given time we had a thousand or so bugs open, with at best 3 people, at worst 1 person working on them. I'm incredibly proud of what we've managed to achieve with the Fedora kernel. More than just the base for RHEL, it changed the whole landscape of upstream kernel development.

  • Our insistence on shipping the latest code, with as few 'special sauce' patches won over a lot of upstream developers that wouldn't have given us the time of day for similar bugs back in the RHL days. Sometimes painful for our users, but Linux as a whole got better because of our stance here.
  • Decisions like Fedora enabling debug options by default in betas shook out an unbelievable number of bugs almost as soon as they get introduced. Again, painful for users, but from a quality standpoint, we found a ton of bugs in code others were racing to ship first and call "enterprise ready".
  • Fedora enabling features sometimes before they were fully baked got us a lot of love from their respective upstream maintainers.

Despite this progress though, I always felt we were on a treadmill making no real forward progress. That constant 1000 or so bugs kept nagging at me. As fast as we closed them out, a new batch would arrive.

In more recent years, we tried to split the workload within the team so we could do more proactive bug-finding before users even find them. My own 'trinity' project has found so many serious bugs (filesystem corruptors, root holes, vm corner cases, the list goes on) that it got to be almost a full time job just tracking everything.

I used to feel that leaving Red Hat wasn't something I could do. On a few occasions I actually turned down offers from potential employers, because "What about the Fedora kernel?". For the first time since the project has begun I feel like I've left things in more than capable hands, and I'm sure things will continue to move in the right direction.

3 RHL's. 5 and a half RHEL's. 21 Fedoras. You don't even want to know how much hardware I've destroyed in the line of duty in this time. It's been uh, an experience.

So, after all this time, one thing I have learned, is that all this was definitely one of my better decisions. I hope that my next decision turns out to be an equally good one.