Future development of Trinity.

It’s been an odd few weeks regarding Trinity based things.

First an email from a higher-up at my former employer asking (paraphrased)..

"That thing we asked you to stop working on when you worked here, any chance now you've left you'll implement these features."

I’m still trying to get my head around the thought process that led to that being a reasonable thing to ask. I’ve made the occasional commit over the last six months, but it’s mostly been code motion, clean-up work, and things like syscall table updates. New feature development came to a halt long ago.

It’s no coincidence that the number of bugs reported found with Trinity have dropped off sharply since the beginning of the year, and I don’t think it’s because the Linux kernel suddenly got lots better. Rather, it’s due to the lack of real ongoing development to “try something else” when some approaches dry up. Sadly we now live in a world where it’s easier to get paid to run someone else’s fuzzer these days than it is to develop one.

Then earlier this week, came the revelation that the only people prepared to fund that kind of new feature development are pretty much the worst people.

Apparently Hacking Team modified Trinity to fuzz ioctl() on Android, which yielded some results. I’ve done no analysis on whether those crashes are are exploitable/fixed/only relevant to Android etc. (Frankly, I’m past caring). I’m not convinced their approach is particularly sound even if it was finding results Trinity wasn’t, so it looks unlikely there are even ideas to borrow here. (We all already knew that ioctl was ripe with bugs, and had practically zero coverage testing).

It bothers me that my work was used as a foundation for their hack-job. Then again, maybe if I hadn’t released Trinity, they’d have based on iknowthis, or some other less useful fuzzer. None of this really should surprise me. I’ve known for some time that there are some “security” people that have their own modifications they have no intention of sending my way. Thanks to the way that people that release 0-days are revered in this circus, there’s no incentive for people to share their modifications if it means that someone else might beat them to finding their precious bugs.

It’s unfortunate that this project has attracted so many awful people. When I began it, the motivation had nothing to do with security. Back in 2010 we were inundated in weird oopses that we couldn’t reproduce, many times triggered by jvm’s. I came up with the idea that maybe a fuzzer could create a realistic enough workload to tickle some of those same bugs. Turned out I was right, and so began a series of huge page and other VM related bug fixes.

In the five years that I’ve made Trinity available, I’ve received notable contributions from perhaps a half dozen people. In return I’ve made my changes available before I’d even given them runtime myself.

It’s a project everyone wants to take from, but no-one wants to give back to.

And that’s why for the foreseeable future, I’m unlikely to make public any further feature work I do on it.
I’m done enabling assholes.